EDGE Achivements

Since EDGE was established in 2007, our passion for nature, optimism and determination to help solve the species extinction crisis, have helped us meet a huge number of conservation milestones. In the last five years we have kick-started the careers of 28 conservationists from developing countries, re-discovered three animals thought to be extinct, discovered one entirely new species, developed four conservation strategies, and expanded the programme so that we now work in over 20 countries worldwide.

Take a moment to browse through our conservation timeline below and learn more about our history.

Apr
2012
London

Danwei Huang’s new paper on the Scleractinian (reef-building) coral tree of life resulted in EDGE scores for all coral species, producing the top 50 EDGE Coral list.

Top 50 EDGE Coral species >

Nov
2011
Instant Wild App is Released
London

A revolutionary new tool that delivers live photographs of wild animals from motion sensitive cameras placed in remote locations across the globe.

The public can then contribute to scientific research by identifying different animals.

Get Instant Wild for free >

Nov
2011
Conservation Tools Training Course for New Fellows
Nepal

New fellows from around the world joined the EDGE team in Chitwan National Park. Over four weeks, they were trained in conservation biology, ecological monitoring, social surveying and action planning.

Meet the Fellows >

Sep
2011
Reforestation Programme for the Slender Loris Begins
Sri Lanka

After the success of the the slender loris campaign, ZSL EDGE scientist Craig Turner travelled out to help the local communities begin replanting native species of vegetation, reconnecting existing forest patches and promoting environmental awareness.

Find out more about the project >
Jul
2011
First EDGE Coral Reefs Training Course
Hoga, Indonesia

Eight early-career conservationists spent three weeks learning vital skills in research, monitoring and management of coral reefs, which are essential to preserving the biodiversity of the world's oceans.

View the 2011 Indonesian Slideshow >

Jan
2011
EDGE Coral Reefs Launched
Nov
2010
New EDGE Mammals List Revealed
London

The Chinese pangolin (left) was one of 49 new mammals on the new EDGE list, which also included the rondo dwarf galago (far left), the Kha-Nyou and the elusive saola antelope. Species lists are regularly revised so that EDGE stays up to date.

Discover the real EDGE Science >
Sep
2010
Boni Forest Sengi is Caught on Camera
Kenya

While searching for the golden-rumped elephant shrew, EDGE Fellow Grace Wambui captured the first images of the Boni Forest Sengi, possibly a new species of elephant shrew.

Read the blog >
Jul
2010
Rediscovery of the Horton Plains Slender Loris
Sri Lanka

ZSL EDGE scientists reported the first close examination in 70 years of this slender loris (left) subspecies after more than 200 hours of surveys.

An online campaign by EDGE raised over £5,000 for a reforestation programme to help the loris populations recover.

Jul
2010
An Amphibian Conservation Victory for EDGE
New Zealand

The government abandons plans to mine 7,000 hectares of land that is habitat for two top priority EDGE amphibians: Archey’s frog and Hochstetter’s frog (right) following public pressure.

More weird amphibians >

Jun
2010
Salamander Conservation Strategy Workshop in China
Oct
2009
Launch of the Last Survivors Project
Dominican Republic

A three-year conservation project for the Hispaniolan solenodon and Hispaniolan hutia (left) received support from the Darwin Initiative.

The project is co-ordinated by EDGE and the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust.

The Last Survivors Project >

Jun
2009
The President of Liberia visits Sapo National Park
Liberia

Her Excellency Madam Ellen Johnson Sirleaf was reportedly excited by the wild pygmy hippo photos taken in 2008, so she paid a visit to Sapo National Park and met rangers like our Fellow John Konie, calling on the people of Liberia to protect their animals and forests.

Find out more about the pygmy hippo >

Dec
2008
"Animals at the EDGE" Book is Published
London

A great educational resource for the EDGE Programme and some of the key species that we are trying to save from extinction. The exciting stories are accompanied by amazing photography, so whether you are seven or seventy you can join the scientists on their adventures around the world

Buy a copy and help contribute to our conservation work >

Mar
2008
Wild Pygmy Hippos Seen for the First Time in Liberia
Liberia

EDGE Fellow John Konie and a team from ZSL made the first photographic records of wild pygmy hippos from Liberia, and the second ever footage filmed globally.

Jan
2008
EDGE Amphibians is Launched

Archey's frog - the number one amphibian ambassador for EDGE

Dec
2007
Woodlark Island Cuscus is Saved From Extinction
Woodlark Island

After a huge public response to an online campaign sparked by an EDGE blog, the Malaysian company Vitroplant abandoned its plans to convert the island to oil palm plantations, successfully saving the habitat of local populations of the woodlark cuscus.

Read about other species of cuscus >

Jul
2007
Attenborough's Long-Beaked Echidna Proved to Exist
Papua New Guinea

Scientists from ZSL undertook initial survey work and they found physical signs that confirmed the presence of the elusive echidna.

One of its closest relatives is the eastern long-beaked echidna (left) also endemic to Papua New Guinea.

May
2007
Rediscovery of the Hispaniolan Solenodon in Haiti
Jan
2007
The EDGE of Existence Programme is Launched
London

EDGE is the first global-scale programme specifically developed to conserve the world’s most evolutionarily distinct and globally endangered (EDGE) animals, which have few close relatives and are uniquely irreplaceable in the web of life.

The first mammals list is released and our first EDGE Fellow, Uuganbadrakh Oyunkhishig from Mongolia, is appointed to study the jerboa (left).

Find out more about EDGE >