EDGE Blog Home |Archive | July, 2011

Species of the Week: a squirrel? a rat? No, its Kha-Nyou (Laonastes aenigmamus)

Species of the Week: a squirrel? a rat? No, its Kha-Nyou (Laonastes aenigmamus)

This weeks star comes to you courtesy of our twitter followers. Kha-Nyou resembles a cross between a squirrel and a large rat, with its elongated head, small, rounded ears and a bushy tail; but is actually more closely related to guinea pigs and chinchillas. Despite being the sole representative of 44 million years of unique […]

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The First Three Days of My Life as an EDGE Trainee

The First Three Days of My Life as an EDGE Trainee

The EDGE Corals Training Course began last week at Operation Wallacea’s field site in Hoga, Indonesia. The course is lead by Catherine Head  EDGE Coral Reefs Co-ordinator, Dave Smith from Essex University Coral Reef Unit, and Bert Hoeksema  from Naturalis Center of Biodiversity, Netherlands. To find out more about the course visit EDGE Coral Reefs Training Course. I made it! Three […]

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Species of the Week: Hispaniolan Solenodon (Solenodon paradoxus)

Species of the Week: Hispaniolan Solenodon (Solenodon paradoxus)

The Hispaniolan Solenodon is not only one of the most evolutionarily distinct and threatened mammals in the world; but also, one of the few poisonous ones. It produces toxic saliva, which it injects into its prey through special grooves in its incisor teeth. Solenodons diverged from all other living mammals during the Cretaceous Period, an […]

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News: Shark Protection Soars as Understanding Improves.

Scientists say the shark fin trade has contributed to the catastrophic declines of shark populations worldwide. It threatens to disrupt ocean ecosystems and encourages the proliferation of other predators, which in turn diminishes stocks of fish for human consumption. Finning involves cutting off the fins of sharks then throwing them back into the ocean, often while […]

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Extraordinary and Threatened Bats

When I was still a teenager, I had my first opportunity to work with bats while volunteering to help a PhD student in his fieldwork.  I quickly developed a soft spot for these incredible animals.  Bats are diverse and fascinating, yet they have been the target of much misunderstanding and persecution. As a result, bat […]

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