EDGE Blog Home |Archive | August, 2011

Species of the Week: Asian tapir (Tapirus indicus)

Species of the Week: Asian tapir (Tapirus indicus)

A unique distinctive feature of tapirs is their short gripping trunk, which truly is an extended prehensile nose and upper lip. It allows a tapir to grab leaves from twigs, have an incredible sense of smell and even use it as a snorkel while swimming. This fleshy prehensile trunk has changed little in millions of […]

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I’m leaving on a jetplane, don’t know when I’ll be back again

I’m leaving on a jetplane, don’t know when I’ll be back again

Time flies. 3 weeks seems like just 3 days ago. We were transferred to the bigger boat by Papalo, the same boat that took us diving for 3 weeks. It’s a heavy feeling to wave goodbye to Hoga and Dave, Pippa, Sarah, Andy and all the staffs and students in Oppwall. It was really a […]

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EDGE Fellow to the Rescue

EDGE Fellow to the Rescue

Clauidio Soto Azat EDGE fellow in the Darwin’s frog Project and Researcher at the Universidad Andrés Bello (UNAB) lead a rescue operation of four Darwin’s frogs from a population 10 km south of the eruption of Chile’s Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcano. On June 4th Chile’s Cordon Caulle fissure in the Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcanic complex in the Southern […]

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Species of the Week: Archey’s Frog

Species of the Week: Archey’s Frog

This frog is often described as a “living fossil” since it is almost indistinguishable from the fossilised remains of frogs that lived 150 million years ago. Archey’s frog (Leiopelma archeyi) is one of four species of prehistoric New Zealand frogs which are the most ancient and primitive frogs in the world. To give you an […]

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And the course comes to an end

And the course comes to an end

The first EDGE Coral Reefs training course has been completed, and I gained a lot of information and new knowledge from it. The course participants were from the coral triangle region and the teachers were experts in the field. Dr. Bert Hoeksema, for example, taught us how to identify coral reef development and name new discoveries, as well as the symbiotic role of corals and how they function as a micro […]

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