EDGE Blog Home |Archive | December, 2011

Amazing year…more to come

Amazing year…more to come

End of the year on the Last Survivors project… As we approach the end of 2011 its time to once again reflect on the year and look forward to the year ahead. This year really has really been quite amazingly productive despite some of challenges that we have faced. Our success has primarily come about […]

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Camera captures rare glimpse of pygmy hippo

Camera captures rare glimpse of pygmy hippo

Camera traps are revolutionising our ability to track the changing fate of wildlife. Often used in remote locations looking for elusive species, this automated digital device that takes a photo whenever an animal triggers an infrared sensor, is producing rare glimpses into the secret lives of animals. In 2008, scientists from ZSL started a new programme […]

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A great month for the livelihoods project in Sagalla

A  great month for the livelihoods project in Sagalla

The alternative livelihoods project to secure a future for he Sagalla caecilian never stops… Tree planting The weather has favoured tree planting this month, enabling us to plant 1,200 indigenous seedlings in an area of burnt exotic forest (mainly Eucalyptus). 4,000 seedlings in total will be planted in this area this season. The tree planting […]

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Renewed passion for conservation

Renewed passion for conservation

Our next blog from an EDGE training course participants comes from Badri Vinod Dahal. Badri is the Assistant Conservation Officer at Makalu Barun National Park which is the world’s only protected area with an elevation gain of more than 8,000m encompassing tropical forest as well as snow-capped peaks. As part of his job, Badri is […]

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Species of the week: Togo Slippery Frog

Species of the week: Togo Slippery Frog

It is not immediately obvious that the Togo slippery frog (Conraua derooi), which reaches the moderate sizes of 75-85 mm, is a close relative of the largest frog in the world: the Goliath frog (Conraua goliath), which grows to 400 mm. This species is forest-dependent, and lives in or near fast-flowing water, where its tadpoles […]

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