EDGE Blog Home |Archive | April, 2012

Researching the Ganges River Dolphin in Bangladesh: a PhD to remember!

The Ganges River Dolphin (Platanista gangetica) is not your conventional ‘Flipper’: they are virtually blind and live in murky rivers; they aren’t particularly social and tend to live on their own or in very small groups; they have lots of jagged teeth that are constantly visible; and they won’t bounce balls on their heads. Despite […]

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Species of the Week: New Zealand Greater Short-Tailed Bat

  The New Zealand greater short-tailed bat (Mystacina robusta) has been described as ‘the bat family’s attempt to produce a mouse’, due to their unique ability to scramble over the ground as well as fly. This bat is one of only two species in the family Mystacinidae, part of the Noctilionoidea ‘superfamily’. Until recently, its […]

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Translocation may be the Last Chance for Sumatran Rhinos

Sumatran rhinos (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) are critically endangered. It is estimated that there are only around 200 individuals in highly fragmented populations around Borneo and Sumatra, with doubts that the population living in the Malaysian peninsula still exists. The fact that they are so spread apart geographically presents a myriad of problems, the primary one being […]

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In Search of the Pygmy Three-toed Sloth – Part I – Supplies, Storms & Sebastian

After 13 months of project planning, fund raising and reviewing the available literature, Craig Turner and I were at the stage of actually procuring equipment and field supplies ahead of our expedition to Panama in search of the Critically Endangered Pygmy Three-toed Sloth (Bradypus pygmaeus). Amongst the usual kit requirements, head torches, hammocks, insect repellent […]

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Species of the Week: It’s the Easter Bunny! (also known as the Riverine Rabbit)

  EDGE mammal number 10, the riverine rabbit (Bunolagus monticularis), lives in an area of the Karoo Desert in South Africa’s Cape Province that is ideal for agriculture, and unfortunately has now lost 50-80% of its habitat to farming. The species is finding it almost impossible to recover and is in desperate need of conservation […]

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