EDGE Blog Home |Archive | June, 2012

Negros Interior Biodiversity Expedition – Part II

In the previous blog, the NIBE team had set up their camera traps in areas of known mammal activity in the North Negros National Park in the Philippines, analysed over 4,000 hours of data and captured some amazing footage. Expedition leader James Sawyer shares his thoughts…                   […]

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Species of the Week: Numbat

The numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus) is very different from other marsupials. It is the only living representative of the Myrmecobiidae family of carnivorous marsupials, and interestingly had the (now extinct) Tasmanian tiger as a cousin. Once widespread across Australia, the species is now extinct in over 99% of its former range. The base fur colour varies […]

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First Sumatran Rhino Baby Born in Captivity in Indonesia

Last weekend, there was some happy news for Way Kambas National Park in Sumatra: their captive female Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) Ratu gave birth to a healthy male calf. Previously Ratu has had two miscarriages, and the 15 month pregnancy made it a nail-biting waiting game for the staff at the park. The calf, named […]

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Sagalla Caecilian Conservation Makes Significant Progress in Kenya

In Kenya, the Sagalla Caecilian Conservation Project is carrying out habitat rehabilitation through planting of indigenous trees and vetiva grass in Sagalla Hill forest, to reduce soil erosion and increase soil fertility to improve the habitat quality for the Sagalla caecilian (Boulengerula niedeni). The project is also working with locals to help them create livelihoods […]

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Species of the Week: Granular Salamander

The granular salamander (Ambystoma granulosum) is a very unusual EDGE species. Belonging to the Ambystomatidae (or “mole salamander”) family, which diverged from all other salamanders over 140 million years ago, it is highly evolutionarily distinct. This species’ skin is corrugated or granular, especially along the tail, which explains its common name, and it has twelve […]

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