EDGE Blog Home |Tag Archives: Red List

First Sumatran Rhino Baby Born in Captivity in Indonesia

Last weekend, there was some happy news for Way Kambas National Park in Sumatra: their captive female Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) Ratu gave birth to a healthy male calf. Previously Ratu has had two miscarriages, and the 15 month pregnancy made it a nail-biting waiting game for the staff at the park. The calf, named […]

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Species of the Week: Sharp-snouted Day Frog

With only three individuals reported since 1994, it is possible that the sharp-snouted day frog (Taudactylus acutirostris) is already extinct. This frog was the first species in which the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis was identified, which causes the devastating ‘frog-killing’ disease chytridiomycosis. The sharp-snouted day frog belongs to the Myobatrachidae family, which arose around 100 million […]

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Species of the Week: New Zealand Greater Short-Tailed Bat

  The New Zealand greater short-tailed bat (Mystacina robusta) has been described as ‘the bat family’s attempt to produce a mouse’, due to their unique ability to scramble over the ground as well as fly. This bat is one of only two species in the family Mystacinidae, part of the Noctilionoidea ‘superfamily’. Until recently, its […]

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Cryptozoology, Extinction and Recovery: Conservation’s Never-ending Battles

Piercing through the dark fog of pessimistic predictions for conservation’s future, rays of hope are appearing, in the guise of newly discovered species or subspecies. The last century has been a hotbed of new findings, including the mountain gorilla, the colossal squid, and EDGE species the saola (or Vu Quang ox, discovered in 1992). Now […]

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Species of the Week: Bactrian Camel

The only true wild camels that still exist are Bactrian camels (Camelus ferus). This species can survive in one of the most hostile environments on Earth, the Gobi desert of Mongolia, withstanding long periods of drought, starvation and even radiation from nuclear weapons testing.   The ancestors of the true camels migrated to Asia about […]

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