Setzer's Mouse-tailed Dormouse
(Myomimus setzeri)
DD
Overview
Unlike other dormice, which have rather bushy tails, the three species of mouse-tailed dormice have a thinly haired, mouse-like tail covered with short, white hairs. Very little is known about these species. They are the only dormice not specialised for an arboreal lifestyle. Instead they seem to live on or under the ground. Setzer’s mouse-tailed dormouse is thought to be threatened, because it is known only from a very small area of declining habitat.
Urgent Conservation Actions
No official conservation recommendations have been made.
Distribution
Northwestern Iran.
Media from ARKive
ARKive image - Setzer's mouse-tailed dormouse specimen
ARKive image - Setzer's mouse-tailed dormouse specimen, from above
Evolutionary Distinctiveness
Order: Rodentia
Family: Gliridae
The family Myoxidae (also known as Gliridae) contains 28 species in 9 genera. It is an ancient family, thought to have originated sometime during the middle Eocene (45 million years ago). In the Pleistocene (1.8 million to 10,000 years ago), giant species lived on some of the Mediterranean islands. Living dormice are intermediate in form and behaviour between mice and squirrels. There are three species of mouse-tailed dormice (genus Myomimus): M. personatus (masked mouse-tailed dormouse), M. roachi (Roach's mouse-tailed dormouse) and M. setzeri (Setzer’s mouse-tailed dormouse).
Description
Size: 
Head and body length: 61-120 mm
Tail length: 53-94mm
Weight: 21-56 g
Unlike other dormice, which have rather bushy tails, the three species of “mouse-like” dormice have a thinly haired, mouse-like tail covered with short, white hairs. The upper parts are reddish-brown mixed with grey. The underparts, insides of limbs and feet are white. There is a sharply defined line of demarcation between the upper and lower parts.
Ecology
The three mouse-like dormice are the only dormice not specialised for an arboreal lifestyle. Instead, they appear to live on and under the ground. The breeding period is thought to be from April to June, and the presence of seven pairs of mammae on the females suggests that females give birth to large numbers of offspring. Remains of Setzer’s mouse-tailed dormice have been found in the pellets of the Eurasian eagle owl (Bubo bubo), suggesting that it is an important prey species of this predator.
Habitat
Has been found in open country with clusters of trees and bushes, such as the edges of grain fields, orchards, gardens and riverbanks. Most specimens were trapped on trees, especially mulberry, but none were taken in forests.
Distribution
Population Estimate
Unknown.
Population Trend
Unknown.
Status
Classified as Endangered (EN A1c) on the 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
Threats
Suitable habitat is very limited and declining.
Conservation Underway
There do not appear to be any conservation measures in place for this species.
Conservation Proposed
No official conservation recommendations have been made.
References
Baillie, J. 1996. Myomimus setzeri. In: IUCN 2006. 2006 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 09 October 2006.

Nowak, R.M. 1999. Walker's Mammals of the World. Sixth edition. The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore and London.

Distribution map based on data provided by the IUCN Global Mammal Assessment.

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